ESPN’s Major Conference Champion Predictions After Week 2

first_imgThe College GameDay crew on set in New York City.NEW YORK, NY – SEPTEMBER 23: Lee Corso, Kirk Herbstreit, Chris Fowler are seen during ESPN’s College GameDay show at Times Square on September 23, 2017 in New York City. (Photo by Mike Stobe/Getty Images)With the first two weeks of the college football season in the books, ESPN has released predictions for each major conference. These projections are subject to change once conference play comes around.ESPN’s Football Power Index serves as a measure of each team’s strength based on their performances and upcoming schedule.It’s still early in the season, but each conference has a clear favorite through the first two weeks.Although it won’t exactly surprise many people, the two best teams in the country are favored to win their respective conference. Clemson is projected to get through the ACC with ease, meanwhile Alabama is favored to get through a crowded SEC that features programs, such as Georgia and LSU. Oklahoma is expected to win the Big 12 this year under Jalen Hurts. It’ll have to fend off Texas if it wants to win another conference title.The other conference winners are a little bit more bold. ESPN has Wisconsin winning the Big Ten and Oregon coming out of the Pac-12.ESPN’s FPI released percentages for how likely these programs are to win their conference. Here are those percentages:Clemson – 90.0 percentOklahoma – 60.6 percentOregon – 52.4 percentAlabama – 48.7 percentWisconsin – 30.0 percentIt’ll be interesting to see how these projections change as the season goes on.Do you agree with these conference champion predictions?last_img read more

US business restocking flat in March while sales fall 11 per cent

US business restocking flat in March while sales fall 1.1 per cent, largest drop in 9 months by Martin Crutsinger, The Associated Press Posted May 13, 2013 10:12 am MDT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email WASHINGTON – U.S. businesses left their stockpiles unchanged in March for a second straight month while their sales fell sharply.The Commerce Department said Monday that business stockpiles showed no increase in March on a seasonally adjusted basis. Businesses hadn’t upped their restocking in February, either. Sales fell 1.1 per cent in March, offsetting a 1 per cent gain in February.A lack of inventory building could slow economic growth because it means businesses are ordering fewer factory-made goods, especially when sales are falling. However, a report on spending at retail businesses in April suggests consumers rebounded after a weak March. That could lead businesses to replenish their shelves this spring.For March, manufacturers and retailers both increased their stockpiles 0.2 per cent, while wholesale businesses cut their inventories 0.3 per cent.All three categories of businesses experienced lower sales in March, leading to the biggest decline since June.A separate Commerce report Monday showed that retail sales bounced back in April. Retail sales edged up a slight 0.1 per cent in April. But sales were much stronger when excluding a steep drop in gas prices. When excluding gas station sales, retail spending rose 0.7 per cent in April.The government also said retail sales in February was slightly stronger than last reported, while March slightly weaker.The government estimated last month that the economy grew at an annual rate of 2.5 per cent in the January-March quarter. That was up from a growth rate of 0.4 per cent in the previous quarter.Growth accelerated in the first quarter largely because consumer spending rose at the fastest pace in more than two years. But some economists expect growth has slowed slightly in the current April-June quarter to around 2 per cent.Consumers increased their spending in April, despite paying higher Social Security taxes that has reduced their paychecks this year. Their spending will likely add to economic growth in the April-June quarter. Consumer spending makes up roughly 70 per cent of economic activity.Steady job growth could offset some of the impact of the tax increase. The economy has added an average of 208,000 jobs a month from November through April. That’s up from only 138,000 a month in the previous six months. The job gains could provide consumers with more money to offset the impact of the tax increase.Cheaper gas is leaving consumers with more disposable income. The national average price has risen slightly over the past week to $3.58 a gallon. But it is still 21 cents lower than the peak price reached on Feb. 27. read more