CONSTITUTIONAL REVIEW REPORT COMES AHEAD OF JMC IN LONDON

first_img Related Items:british overseas territories, Constitutional Review Committee, foreign commonwealth office, joint ministral council, peter beckingham, rufus ewing Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp NEW CHAIRMAN, PNP keeps Ewing Recommended for you Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppProvidenciales, 27 Nov 2014 – Government will today present to media the findings contained within the report of the Constitutional Review Committee. A press conference is planned for this afternoon. The information comes just before the Premier is due to head off to London for the JMC or the Joint Ministerial Council for British Overseas Territories on December 1-4, 2014. Hon Dr. Rufus Ewing and Govenor, HE Peter Beckingham will both attend. It is believed the Premier will use this JMC as an opportunity to share the views of islanders with the Foreign and Commonwealth Office on the 2011 version of the Constitution, perhaps even talk of independence will come up. MM is also told the country’s Tourism Minister is seriously exploring opening a significant presence for the TCI in London. PNP Convention Feb 19 Weekend; South Caicos woman announces at large interest Coming budget proposes police recruitment and aerial surveillance, says Premierlast_img read more

Huawei P30 Pro might have four rear cameras and launch in March

first_img Phones Apple Share your voice Aug 31 • iPhone XR vs. iPhone 8 Plus: Which iPhone should you buy? Sep 1 • iPhone 11, Apple Watch 5 and more: The final rumors See All Mentioned Above Huawei P30 (128GB, black) The Huawei P20 Pro is a low-light photography champ See it Tags 3 CNET may get a commission from retail offers. See how the Huawei P20 Pro’s cameras stacks up to the Galaxy S9 Plus, iPhone X and Pixel 2 2:16 Aug 31 • Your phone screen is gross. Here’s how to clean itcenter_img Now playing: Watch this: Huawei P30 Aug 31 • Best places to sell your used electronics in 2019 reading • Huawei P30 Pro might have four rear cameras and launch in March Could this really be the Huawei P30 Pro? If so what do all those cameras do? Spigen Last year, the Huawei P20 Pro and its triple rear cameras stole the show from other photo heavy hitters like the Google Pixel 2 and iPhone X. And while there are rumors that the 2019 iPhone and the upcoming Galaxy S10 Plus will have three rear cameras, it seems Huawei isn’t one to be outdone. A photo of a case for the unreleased Huawei P30 Pro shows the phone with four rear cameras. This could be a case of Huawei literally one-upping Samsung and Apple.As reported by Android Authority, phone case maker Spigen published photos of the Huawei P30 Pro sporting a clear plastic case. The case has a cutout for a camera bump with four rear cameras stacked vertically. Another photo on the site shows the front of the phone sporting a notched display. The notch looks like a half-circle with curved edges.Four rear cameras is terribly exciting but what could they all be used for? For that, we’ll have to wait for the Huawei P30 Pro to be released, which might not be that long. According to TechRadar, the Polish website Telix says that the Huawei P30 and P30 Pro will launch at the end of March at an event in Paris. This is obviously after Mobile World Congress which is at the end of February.Huawei did not immediately respond to a request to comment. $534 47 Photos News • Huawei P30 Pro in a gorgeous orange finish leaks Google Huawei Samsung Apple Review • Huawei P30 review: The P30 Pro’s fantastic photos for less Comments • How To • Huawei P30 phone announcement: How to watch, what to expectlast_img read more

Rohingyas still coming 32 enter in 7 days

first_imgSmoke is seen on the Myanmar border as Rohingya refugees walk on the shore after crossing the Bangladesh-Myanmar border by boat through the Bay of Bengal, in Shah Porir Dwip, Bangladesh 11 September 2017. ReutersAt least 32 Rohingya of 8 families have freshly entered Bangladesh through Teknaf border last week.  Some families started to cross the river Naf on 19 April.   They were initially sent to Bangladesh Army’s relief camp in Sabrang union, Teknaf.Upazila senior fisheries officer Md Delwar Hossain, representing the district commissioner of Cox’s Bazar at the camp, told Prothom Alo that the Rohingya arrival had stopped for some time. But as the remaining Rohingyas face food shortage and restricted movement in Myanmar, they are compelled to come into Bangladesh afresh. The relatives of the newly arrived refugees entered Bangladesh earlier.They were sheltered in Noyapara Rohingya camp, he added.Though Bangladesh has signed a Rohingya repatriation deal with Myanmar on November last year,  Rohingya’s are still arriving intermittently.  In another move on February, Bangladesh handed over an initial list of 8032 refugees to be repatriated to Myanmar at a home minister level meeting in Dhaka. More than seven hundred thousand Rohingyas arrived in Bangladesh since 25 August last year in the face of severe persecution in Myanmar.Immigration and passport department’s deputy director Abu Noman Muhammad Zakir Hossain told Prothom Alo that, a total of 1,1 09,864 new and old registered Rohingyas were staying in different camps of Ukhiya and Teknaf upazila.last_img read more

UN prepares ground for Yemen peace talks

first_imgIranians carry placards as they demonstrate in front of the UN office in Tehran on 20 November 2018, in support of the Yemen people. Photo: AFPUN envoy Martin Griffiths was preparing Tuesday to head to war-torn Yemen to lay the groundwork for peace talks in Sweden, after fresh fighting shook the flashpoint city of Hodeida.Griffiths—whose efforts at kickstarting peace talks collapsed in September—is again trying to get the Iran-aligned Huthi rebels and the Saudi-backed government to the negotiating table by the end of the year.He is expected to meet with Huthi officials in the capital Sanaa on Wednesday.Both sides have in the past week expressed their support for the envoy and his mission to hold talks in Stockholm, but fierce clashes erupted in the Red Sea city of Hodeida late Monday after a lull.Military officials said the battles were the worst since loyalists halted an offensive last week, and were concentrated in the eastern part of the city where rebels fired artillery.Pro-government forces struck back, supported by warplanes from the Saudi-led coalition which launched a dozen raids, the sources said.According to Huthi-run media, clashes lasted up to four hours and resulted in fatalities.The city was relatively calm on Tuesday morning, according to an AFP correspondent who spoke to residents by telephone from Khokha about 100 kilometres (62 miles) away.Call for truce – On Monday, Britain presented to the UN Security Council a draft resolution urging an immediate truce in Hodeida, whose port serves as an entry point to nearly all imports and humanitarian aid to the impoverished country.The draft, circulated by Britain to the 14 other council members and seen by AFP, sets a two-week deadline for the warring sides to remove all barriers to humanitarian aid.The proposed resolution would significantly ratchet up pressure on the Saudi-led coalition and the Huthis to seek a negotiated settlement in Yemen, where millions are on the brink of starvation.It also calls for a large injection of foreign currency to support Yemen’s collapsing currency and for salaries of civil servants, teachers, and health workers to be paid within a month.Mohammed Ali al-Huthi, head of the Huthi rebels’ Higher Revolutionary Committee and an influential political figure, tweeted on Monday that he wanted his group to announce “readiness to suspend and halt all military operations” and stop firing missiles on Saudi Arabia.Riyadh also lent its support to new talks.Saudi King Salman told the Shura Council, his country’s top advisory body, that the kingdom backed a “political solution” and a “comprehensive national dialogue” in Yemen.Multiple past attempts to hold negotiations between the government alliance and Huthis have failed.Griffiths said on Monday he hoped the rivals would meet in Sweden “within the next few weeks”. No date has yet been set.‘Stop selling weapons’ – The Huthis seized Sanaa in late 2014, when they also took control of Hodeida and its port.A year later, Saudi Arabia and its allies intervened in the war to bolster Yemeni president Abedrabbo Mansour Hadi.Both parties in the conflict stand accused of acts that could amount to war crimes.Human Rights Watch on Tuesday called on France to address laws-of-war violations with the UAE—a key member of the Saudi-led coalition—during Crown Prince Mohammed bin Zayed al-Nahyan’s visit to Paris on 21 November.“If president (Emmanuel) Macron is truly concerned about the humanitarian crisis in Yemen, he should tell the crown prince that France will stop selling weapons to the UAE if there’s a real risk of their unlawful use,” said Benedicte Jeannerod, HRW’s director for France.Although Western governments have condemned civilian deaths in Yemen, they remain political and military backers of Saudi Arabia, which is a regional ally and spends billions of dollars on arms from the United States, Britain and France.The World Health Organization says nearly 10,000 people—mostly civilians—have been killed in Yemen since the Saudi intervention in March 2015, but rights groups believe the toll may be five times higher.The World Food Programme says up to 14 million Yemenis are at risk of starvation.On Monday, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates announced they would each give $250 million in aid to the war-ravaged country to support more than 10 million people.last_img read more

Scientists identify oldest wood specimens

first_img(PhysOrg.com) — Researchers studying two fossilized plants, one from New Brunswick, Canada, the other from France have been identified as being 397 and 407 million years old respectively. Both are believed to be the oldest known examples of wood, predating previously found specimens by ten million years. Lead researcher Philippe Gerrienne, of Belgium, and his team have published the results of their research in Science. © 2011 PhysOrg.com The New Brunswick sample was found by co-author Patricia Gensel, who brought it back to the University of North Carolina where she is a professor of paleobotany. The fossil remained on the shelf apparently for several years before it was included in a study being led by Gerrienne, (research associate and lecturer at the University of Liege) of the plant specimen found in France.The two specimens are believed to be not just the earliest examples of wood found, but actual samples of wood in its earliest form of existence. Both plants were very small, just 20 centimeters tall (with stems just 12 centimeters tall and 3 to 5 centimeters wide) and were a type of herb.After studying cross sections of the plants, the researchers have theorized that wood did not evolve as a means to allow plants to grow taller as has been widely assumed, but to allow for the more efficient transfer of water and nutrients from the soil to the rest of the plant. They say they believe this is so because of the way that cells are arranged in the cores of the stems, and even more so because of the existence of long thin cells that grow across several rings, extending like rays from the middle to outer edges of the stems; both are reminiscent of modern trees. The presence of thick walled cells adds to the evidence. Because these structures were in place in very small plants, it’s hard to argue that they evolved to allow for more height.The authors suggest that because these plants were living in a time (the early Devonian age – 407 to 397 million years ago) when the amount of carbon dioxide in the air was decreasing (which reduced water-use efficiency) they were forced into coming up with something quick to survive; hence, the development of wood.The plants discovered are believed to be the ancestors of modern trees, the wood that evolved to help in nourishment wound up having the side benefit of allowing the trees to grow into the comparatively mammoth specimens found around the planet today. Citation: Scientists identify oldest wood specimens (2011, August 12) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2011-08-scientists-oldest-wood-specimens.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Gene discovery to increase biomass needed for green fuel Explore further Image credit: University of Liege More information: A Simple Type of Wood in Two Early Devonian Plants, Science 12 August 2011: Vol. 333 no. 6044 p. 837. DOI:10.1126/science.1208882ABSTRACTThe advent of wood (secondary xylem) is a major event of the Paleozoic Era, facilitating the evolution of large perennial plants. The first steps of wood evolution are unknown. We describe two small Early Devonian (407 to 397 million years ago) plants with secondary xylem including simple rays. Their wood currently represents the earliest evidence of secondary growth in plants. The small size of the plants and the presence of thick-walled cortical cells confirm that wood early evolution was driven by hydraulic constraints rather than by the necessity of mechanical support for increasing height. The plants described here are most probably precursors of lignophytes.last_img read more