ProLiga offers collaboration of a psychologist to its clubs

first_imgProLiga is an organization that was born to ensure modest football. This commission, created to shelter Second Division B and Third clubs, currently has more than 250 member teams from all points of the Spanish geography.It was in September last year when ProLiga decided to go one step further by creating the ProLiga.es portal, thanks to which the coordination between the commission and the clubs was facilitated, in addition to providing multimedia content through its virtual campus. And it is through this virtual campus that this organization has launched a very useful initiative for these days of confinement. ProLiga has created a mental training for “footballers without football”, whose purpose is that the players of the clubs adhered to the platform can channel the absence of competition in their own home.It will not be a physical training, like the one that many soccer players are doing at home, but psychological. In charge of the classes will be the sports psychologist Rocío Pomares. His work, in his own words, will be that of take advantage of the quarantine “together, training something as important both for competition and for life, as is the mental part”.last_img read more

Podcast clues that the medieval plague swept into subSaharan Africa and evidence

first_imgIfe-Sungbo Archaeological Project New archaeological evidence suggests the same black plague that decimated Europe also took its toll on sub-Saharan Africa. Host Sarah Crespi talks with Contributing Correspondent Lizzie Wade about diverse medieval sub-Saharan cities that shrank or even disappeared around the same time the plague was stalking Europe.In a second archaeological story, Meagan Cantwell talks with Gustavo Politis, professor of archaeology at the National University of Central Buenos Aires and the National University of La Plata, about new radiocarbon dates for giant ground sloth remains found in the Argentine archaeological site Campo Laborde. The team’s new dates suggest humans hunted and butchered ground sloths in the late Pleistocene, about 12,500 years ago.This week’s episode was edited by Podigy.Download the transcript (PDF)Listen to previous podcasts.About the Science Podcast[Image: Ife-Sungbo Archaeological Project; Music: Jeffrey Cook]last_img read more