Reinier: “Getting to Real Madrid is the top”

first_imgReinier, who debuted as a professional at Flamengo last year, this season was crowned champion of the Brazilian league and the Copa Libertadores and has become a favorite of the Rio fans. “My love for Flamengo has grown since I was 12 years old. Play for Basque? Never. He’s our rival. Are you crazy?”, concluded the new Real Madrid player. Reinier Jesús is one of the fashion names in Brazil. The recent signing of the young Brazilian midfielder for Real Madrid has not left anyone indifferent and the still Flamengo player does not miss every opportunity to show his happiness for being part of the white club. “It’s a dream come true. Getting to Real Madrid is the top. It’s the biggest club in the world”Brasilia explained in an interview in Balloon support A few days after he granted this newspaper, “It is the realization of a dream. Mine and my family”. “Marcelo sent me a message, also Rodrygo. I was very happy with the welcome they gave me”, continues the young midfielder, who knows that the arrival in Europe will not be easy: “Now it is to go calmly, with your feet on the ground and see what can happen.”last_img read more

Business practices can be shady

first_imgEverybody is hugging trees these days. At the Academy Awards, Leonardo DiCaprio and former Vice President Al Gore boasted that the celebrity gawk-fest purchased “carbon credits” to offset the show’s negative environmental impact. Jakks Pacific in Malibu debuted a line of recycled doggie toys, and a Calabasas realty firm promises to switch to 30percent recycled paper. But as pressure mounts to combat climate change and businesses realize consumers are often willing to pay a premium for environmentally kind products, “green” abuse is exploding. The trend has even spawned the term “greenwashing,” when brands claim to be more eco-friendly than they actually are. “A lot of companies are seeing it as an opportunity to reposition themselves,” said Daniel Hinerfeld, a spokesman at the Natural Resources Defense Council. “It’s very confusing for consumers. Not all of these claims are bona fide.” Colette Brooks, who runs a green ad agency called Big Imagination Group in Culver City, ought to know. She eco-audits clients, asking questions to determine a company’s shade of green. Are they authentically offering products and services that are sustainable? How are the products manufactured? Is the entire life cycle of the product sustainable? “Companies need to seriously look at their business practices in a holistic manner,” Brooks said. But achieving ideal greenness – zero waste and zero energy consumption – is nearly impossible, according to Business for Social Responsibility, a San Francisco-based firm that has helped Genentech Inc., Sony Corp. and The Walt Disney Co. consider their social and environmental impacts. “We have greener products,” president and CEO Aron Cramer . “I’m not sure we ever have perfectly green products.” Instead, BSR focuses on products and services that have the lowest impact on the environment. That’s much easier now that clients come to the table already convinced it is important to consider Mother Nature. For consumers, sorting out who is green and how meaningful eco-friendly claims are can be frustrating. Product labels are not always what they seem. A `cage-free’ stamp on a carton of eggs “doesn’t mean (the chickens) were outside with sun on their backs,” said Urvashi Rangan, a spokeswoman at Consumers Union, which posts reviews of dozens of labels at eco-labels.org. “It could mean they were all crammed onto a barn floor, stepping in each others’ poop.” The terms “natural,” and “biodegradable” are also suspect and not as clear-cut as consumers may think. Evaluating businesses can be even more trying. The Web site www.greenbizleaders.com reviews the business practices of U.S. and foreign companies and claims to be the only one of its kind. Every company on the list has won “credible” awards for making significant progress on its environmental record, said Joel Makower, executive editor of GreenBiz. Firms are searchable by sector and initiative type. One item cites the Palmdale facility of Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Co. for its commitment to reduce hazardous waste and for its plans to work with local groups for land and habitat conservation. But there is no indication how meaningful the steps are and how much they reduce waste. The site only reviews about 1,000 companies, leaving a lot of guesswork for consumers. As for the Oscars, does purchasing “carbon credits” really make a difference, as DiCaprio and Gore bragged, or is it just a way for rich folks to enjoy guilt-free creature comforts? At Jakks Pacific, is the new recycled line merely a gesture tied to Earth Day, or a sign the company has turned over a green leaf? Will Sotheby’s International Realty save trees by switching to 30 percent recycled paper, or will printing new policy manuals overshadow any gains? With no official criteria for being a green business, it’s hard to tell. “What’s exciting,” Makower said, “is how many companies are doing something.” said julia.scott@dailynews.com (818) 713-3735 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img

Where Will Obama Find $100 Million for the New HIV Cure Initiative?

first_imgWhen President Barack Obama announced yesterday “a new initiative at the National Institutes of Health [NIH] to advance research into an HIV cure,” he noted that the government would “redirect $100 million into this project.” But Obama did not specify where the money would be redirected from, and a subsequent NIH press release offered only a hint of more detail, noting that money “will come from existing resources and a redirection of funds from expiring AIDS research grants over the next three years.”In an e-mail to ScienceInsider, Jack Whitescarver, director of NIH’s Office of AIDS Research, explained that “existing resources” means NIH’s existing $3.1 billion HIV/AIDS budget: No new money will come from other parts of NIH. About 20% to 25% of NIH grants expire each year and become eligible to recompete, Whitescarver says, and some will not merit refunding because they focus “on areas of AIDS-related research that are now considered less pressing.” As an example, he singled out research on AIDS-associated opportunistic infections, which previously was a high priority. “But with the advent of effective antiretroviral therapy, that research, while still scientifically meritorious, is now of lower priority for funding with AIDS research dollars,” Whitescarver explained.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)The official shift in priorities meshes with what has been happening in the field. HIV/AIDS researchers over the past 5 years have put increasing emphasis on studying cure-related issues like viral latency and ridding the body of the small reservoir of infected cells that remain even when anti-HIV drugs fully suppress viral replication. NIH has committed $65 million this fiscal year, for example, to research targeting “eradication of viral reservoirs.”Obama’s announcement took many HIV cure researchers and advocates by surprise, but it was welcome news—with a decided note of cautious optimism. “I like the idea that they’re recognizing cure research, but who’s going to decide what other areas of research don’t need to be done?” asks Rowena Johnston, director of research at amfAR, a New York City-based nonprofit that long has been at the forefront of funding cure studies. “We’re very strenuously not a fan of robbing Peter to pay Paul, and right now we don’t know who Peter is.”last_img read more