Paul, Pope fire but Windies lose opener to England

first_imgCHITTAGONG, Bangladesh, (CMC):Half-centuries from Keemo Paul and Gidron Pope failed to save West Indies Under-19s from a 61-run loss to England Under-19s in their opening game of the Under-19 Cricket World Cup here Friday.Chasing an imposing 283 for victory at the Zahur Ahmed Chowdhury Stadium, West Indies collapsed for 221 all out off 43.4 overs, with Paul top scoring with an aggressive 65 and opener Pope gathering an equally fluent run-a-ball 60.However, the Caribbean side were hamstrung by the loss of two wickets off the first four deliveries of the innings and never recovered.Fast bowler Saqib Mahmood tormented the Windies with four for 42 while left-arm seamer Sam Curran (2-23) and leg-spinner Dan Lawrence (2-38) provided support with two wickets apiece.Earlier, England paced their innings well to reached 282 for seven off their 50 overs, after opting to bat first.Callum Taylor, with 59 and Lawrence, 55, stroked half-centuries while George Bartlett struck 48, James Burnham, 44, and Curran, 39.Pope was the best West Indies bowler, picking up two for 45 with his off spin.England benefited from several partnerships early on which provided the ideal foundation.Lawrence, who faced 56 balls and counted eight fours, posted 43 for the first wicket with Max Holden (4) before adding a further 41 for the second wicket with Burnham.When Lawrence was bowled by off-spinner Michael Frew in the 15th over, Burnham and Taylor put on 62 for the third wicket to give England momentum at the half-way stage of the innings.Pope got the breakthrough in the 28th over when he removed Burnham caught and bowled but Bartlett anchored two key partnerships to sustain the momentum, posting 50 for the fourth wicket with Taylor and another 67 for the fifth wicket with Curran.last_img read more

Creamily? Half Blonde and Half Natural 2-Tone Dyed Hair Extensions Medium Short Curly Cosplay Wig :

first_imgI purchased this wig for the reason that it was a extravagant gown at work, desire i could put on this all the time. Postage was economical, obtained here in fewer than 2 weeks, which is good mainly because it’s from china.I acquired this for my good friend (a large melanie martinez admirer) for her birthday and am really satisfied with the good quality. 99 i think and assumed it would be very good excellent mainly because it was reduced from about £50. It is a pretty fairly wig, and the hairs are smooth and don’t really feel like synthetics. I have nonetheless to give my close friend the present, but i’m sure she will like it. It also will come with a wig cap so don’t fear about that x.Creamily? Half Blonde and Half Natural Black 2-Tone Dyed Hair Extensions Medium Short Curly Cosplay WigMaterial: Japanese Kanekalon High Temperature Synthetic Fiber.Use for Cosplay party costume, fashion or just for funColor: 2-tone Color, Half Blonde and Half Natural BlackHairstyle: Medium Short Curly Wig Extension With a hair capSize: It fits most People; you can adjust the hook inside the cap to the correct size to suit your head.I acquired this for my good friend (a large melanie martinez admirer) for her birthday and am really satisfied with the good quality. 99 i think and assumed it would be very good excellent mainly because it was reduced from about £50. It is a pretty fairly wig, and the hairs are smooth and don’t really feel like synthetics. I have nonetheless to give my close friend the present, but i’m sure she will like it. It also will come with a wig cap so don’t fear about that x. Creamily? Half Blonde and Half Natural Black 2-Tone Dyed Hair Extensions Medium Short Curly Cosplay Wig :last_img read more

2018 Ohio State Fair Poultry results

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Grand Champion Market Chickens: Allison Davis, Carroll Co.Res. Grand Champion Market Chickens: Meghan O’Reilly, Geauga Co.Third Overall: Emma Preston, Fairfield Co.Fourth Overall: Anita Ruggles, Huron Co.Fifth overall: Sophia Preston, Fairfield Co.Grand Champion Turkey: Myah Jones, Clinton Co.Res. Grand Champion Turkey: Jozie Jones, Clinton Co.Third Overall: Allison Kinney, Logan Co.Fourth Overall: Mason Jackson, Logan Co.Fifth Overall: Maribeth Pozderac, Knox Co. Market Turkeys  Class 1Johnathan Woodward, Coshocton Co.Carter Henderson, Logan Co. Class 2Maribeth Pozderac, Knox Co.Elizabeth Aleshire, Fayette Co.Hanna Shafer, Miami Co. Class 3Myah Jones, Clinton Co.Allison Kinney, Logan Co.Mitchell Jensen, Fairfield Co. Class 4Jozie Jones, Clinton Co.Mason Jackson, Logan Co.   Market ChickensAllison Davis, Carroll Co.Meghan O’Reilly, Geauga Co.Emma Preston, Fairfield Co.Anita Ruggles, Huron Co.Sophia Preston, Fairfield Co.    Class 1Meghan O’Reilly, Geauga Co.Emma Preston, Fairfield Co. Class 2Seth Abel, Licking Co.Kori Marvin, Union Co.  Class 3Rachel O’Reilly, Geauga Co.Lauren Preston, Fairfield Co. Class 4Allison Davis, Carroll Co.Sophia Preston, Fairfield Class 5Jenna Goddard, Fayette Co.Anita Ruggles, Huron Co.last_img read more

Ohio’s disaster aid levels still uncertain

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Though the disaster declaration for nearly half of Ohio’s counties extends low-interest loans to farmers, many growers are hoping for changes that could offer more financial help, according to experts with The Ohio State University.The full extent of benefits that come with the U.S. Department of Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue’s disaster declaration are still unknown. The federal agency has yet to make decisions about the federal disaster aid bill passed in June.Growers want the USDA to approve requested changes to disaster aid packages that would increase payment guarantees to farmers who file crop insurance claims on acres where they could not plant a cash crop, said Ben Brown, assistant professor of agricultural risk management in the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES).Those changes, if approved, would mean higher payments for farmers hindered in planting this year’s crop as a result of persistent spring rain.Another proposed change to disaster aid would allow farmers who did not have crop insurance at planting time last spring to still potentially get payments on those acres where they could not sow a cash crop.“It’s important to note that the USDA can — but is not required — to make those proposed changes,” Brown said. “Could it happen? Yes. Will it happen? We don’t know.”On July 25, Perdue announced that 40 counties in Ohio can seek disaster relief. In the coming weeks, the USDA is expected to make decisions on the full scope of assistance available to farmers in those counties affected by the unusually challenging growing season.For now, farmers can apply for emergency low-interest loans, but more of them likely will get by instead by using their next payment from the Market Facilitation Program (MFP), Brown said. That assistance helps offset any losses growers experienced as a result of international tariffs on the crops and livestock they produce. The next trade aid payments will be issued in August and will range from $15 to $30 an acre, Brown said.“MFP payments will be significant for farmers in 2019, as they were last year too,” he said.Growers in western and northwestern Ohio were the hardest hit by unprecedented rain levels in the spring when growers typically plant. In Fulton County on the far northwestern border of the state, nearly half the acres that normally grow corn or soybeans won’t hold a cash crop this season, said Eric Richer, an Ohio State University Extension educator in Fulton County. OSU Extension is the outreach arm of CFAES.“I think it’s important that government officials acknowledge the level of hardship that the 2019 growing season has placed on Ohio farmers, particularly those in northwest Ohio,” Richer said.last_img read more