List of Ugandan FIFA referees released

first_imgBrian Nsubuga (right) is retained as a FIFA referee (file photo)MENGO – Four new referees have been added to the list of Ugandan Officials that will don the FIFA Badge for the upcoming year.This was confirmed on Monday evening after the office of the CEO received the list from FIFA.“The office of the CEO is in receipt of the approved list of FIFA referees for 2019, said FUFA Communications Manager, Ahmed Hussein.“FUFA would like to congratulate the referees as we continue to promote Integrity, Fitness and Performance (IFP) with a group that plays a key role in the beautiful game of football.“The referees are expected to maintain high standards when selected for duty on the domestic and international scene.“We are also glad that the number of FIFA referees has increased by one slot from 21 last year to 22 in 2019.The new kids on the block are Murungi Diana and Ayaro Florence (FIFA Women Referees) while Kawagga Bazirio Keneddy is a FIFA Beach Soccer Referee.The full list of Ugandan FIFA Referees 2019:Referees (Men): Miiro Brian Nsubuga, Ssali Mashood, Muhabi Alex, Sabilla Ali and Oloya WilliamAssistant referees (Men); Ssonko Mark, Okello Dick, Katenya Ronald, Okello Lee, Balikoowa Musa Ngobi and Masembe Issa.Referees (Women): Nabadda Shamirah, Murungi Diana, Ayaro FlorenceAssistant referees (Women); Nantabo Lydia Wanyama, Nagaddya Catherine Cynthia, Nakitto Marex Nkumbi and Mutonyi JaneBeach Soccer: Kintu Ivan Bayige, Mugerwa Shafic, Ssenteza Muhammad and Kawagga Bazirio KeneddyComments Tags: Ahmed HusseinFUFAlast_img read more

WWF South Africa honours river expert

first_img12 August 2016It’s impossible to imagine the planet without water. One woman, Dr Jackie King, has devoted her career to this vital commodity. She has passionately worked for 40 years on aquatic ecology, and for her outstanding effort, the World Wildlife Fund South Africa (WWF-SA) awarded her the Living Planet Award.She received the accolade during the fourth Living Planet Conference held in Sandton, Johannesburg at the end of July. The theme this year was “Why South Africa’s future is brighter than you think: a case for optimism”.“In a world filled with seemingly overwhelming challenges, for this year’s Living Planet Conference we decided to turn the question of sustainability on its head,” said WWF-SA chief executive Dr Morné du Plessis.“It is a challenge to us all to think more positively about the changes we can make for the better of all South Africans, particularly in the quest for a more sustainable and equitable future.”Water, the source of all life“We have to look after rivers for them to look after us,” King said. She described rivers as the “life blood of the Earth”. A change of water flow, she said, influenced everything.“It costs more to fix something in the natural environment than it is to take care of it in the first place.”Watch:The WWF-SA praised King for leading scientific teams around the world, working on the management of river flows. Other than scientists, she is engaged with planners and legislators across the globe.King has worked on major river systems, including the Nile in northeastern Africa, Mekong in southeast Asia, Indus in south Asia and Okavango in southwest Africa.The award is in recognition of her efforts to ensure that aquatic ecological research istied to sustainable development and proper management of complex river systems. “Her innovative and practical approaches gave effect to improved water management in the real world,” said the WFF-SA.Source: WWFWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using SouthAfrica.info materiallast_img read more

Late planted corn?

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest With some “late” planting or replanting some are concerned already about whether or not we might be caught by a fall frost before maturity without a change in maturity selection. Not to worry. The corn plant has the ability to adapt to the later planting by advancing more rapidly through the growth stages. Work done at Purdue and Ohio State by graduate students of Bob Nielsen and Peter Thomison, shows that the number of growing degree days (GDD) needed from planting to maturity decreases by about seven GDDs per day of delayed planting. So even a hybrid planted on May 30 needs about 200 less GDDs to achieve maturity than a hybrid planted on May 1.last_img

DAY TWO NATIONAL 18’S SUMMARY

first_imgDay two of the National 18 Years Touch Football Championships was another of picture perfect conditions. Queensland Secondary Schools Touch (QSST) and NSW Combined High Schools (NSWCHS) continued their dominance in both the Mens and Womens competition, but there are certainly other teams setting themselves to challenge for a finals berth on Saturday. MENS: In the Mens division NSWCHS, Sydney Mets, QSST, Central Queensland and North Queensland are looking like they will all be fighting for the title, although an upset or two can never be discounted. The Sydney Mets are looking to challenge the school sides, with Youth World Cup 20’s member Jai Ayoub leading the way with seven touchdowns for the tournament. NSWCHS have also had a relatively easy run, scoring double figures in each of the first four matches; Alyd Owen is leading the side with nine touchdowns for the tournament. QSST have not been troubled except for a 5-5 draw against Central Queensland, who look like a side that may just cause an upset in the finals. The local Northern Eagles side has played well and may just scrape into the top eight finals with matches against South Australia and Victoria still to play. South Australia and Victoria have struggled throughout the tournament, beaten severely most matches, and will no doubt be anticipating their match against each other. NT broke through for their first win at the Championships beating the ACT 7-3. WOMENS: In the Womens division a QSST side stacked with Australian representative players looks difficult to beat, scoring a remarkable 43 touchdowns for the tournament in just the first four matches. Gemma Etheridge and Belinda Hammett have each scored six touchdowns after four rounds, but with all of the QSST side able to score and do so multiple times, it seems the QSST side are red hot favourites. South Queensland Border Districts (SQBD) will be one side looking to challenge their Queensland competition, undefeated in pool three so far. The ACT look like they will miss out on a position in the top eight finals, disappointing considering the improvement they have shown in the past two years. TouchWest (WA) appear to be taking up the challenge to the dominance of NSW and Queensland however, after challenging the top ranked NSWCHS side in a tough 6-4 encounter. If TouchWest can beat NSWCCC in their match tomorrow, they will be virtually guranteed a top eight final and the highest finish of any non-Queensland or NSW side. NSWCHS had another tough match against the NSWCCC side before finishing round four with an easy 15-0 win over SA. Ashleigh Dobbins and Jessie Shea are leading the NSWCHS side, with six touchdowns each for the tournament. The afternoon borught some of the tighest competition so far, NSWCIS and SunCoast playing out a 4-4 draw, while the Southern Suns and the Scorpions also recorded a 4-4 draw. SWQ held off NT 5-4, denying the NT their first win of the 2004 Championships. The final round matches will be played on Friday morning, followed by the qualifying finals Friday afternoon. Play-offs, semi finals and grand finals will be played on Saturday from 8:00am. The Womens grand final will begin at 3:00pm Saturday, followed by the Mens grand final at 4:00pm. Entry to the Coffs Harbour International Sports Stadium is free. For all individual statistics and team positions on the ladders please use the links to the Sporting Pulse results page. This is found on the ATA results story. By Rachel Moyle, media@austouch.com.aulast_img read more

Globe And Mail Cutting Weekday Arts Life Sports Sections

first_img Facebook Twitter Login/Register With: While no staff are expected to be lost as part of the restructuring, some may be reassigned, and consequences for freelancers, as well as the GTA’s Friday Real Estate section, are unclear.Neither editor-in-chief David Walmsley nor Gabe Gonda, the head of Features, Sports, and Opinion, have yet responded to requests for comment, but we’ll be happy to update if they do.Last week, The Globe announced that it would be cutting its Atlantic Canada edition, halting distribution of papers in the region at the end of November.With a report from Jesse Brown. Advertisement LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment The Globe and Mail plans to reduce the number of sections in its weekday print product starting in December. News and Report on Business would survive as standalone sections, with Life & Arts coverage folded into the former and Sports into the latter, as part of a larger redesign of the paper.Final details remain undecided, but several sources connected to the paper expressed concern that the changes would result in a net loss of arts coverage.While the impact on Monday-Thursday arts content would likely be minimal — given the limited space that it currently occupies — the loss of the standalone Film section published on Fridays in the Greater Toronto Area would be more difficult to offset elsewhere in the paper. Deadlines, however, would be later for “A” section content, allowing for more timely arts news and reviews. Advertisement Advertisementlast_img read more

Stress levels rising at Kashechewan along with flood water

first_imgtlamirande@aptn.ca@ToddLamirande Todd LamirandeAPTN NewsLeaders of a flood-prone First Nation implored Ottawa Tuesday to relocate the northern Ontario community.They say the stress and anxiety of being on the move every spring is hurting the people of Kashechewan.And has put some of their children in harm’s way.last_img

Senior Lighty sees similarities between Super Six Thad Five

When David Lighty stepped onto campus in 2006, he was part of a high-profile freshman class. Now, as a fifth-year senior, Lighty sees some similarities between his class and this year’s freshmen. “With the class they have coming in and the number they have coming in, it’s pretty much just like my freshman year,” Lighty said. “It’s happening all over again.” Deemed the “Super Six,” this year’s freshman class is drawing comparisons to the class of ‘06. That year, then-freshmen Greg Oden, Mike Conley Jr., Daequan Cook and Lighty helped the Buckeyes to a National Championship appearance. The hype that surrounded Oden and company is again in Columbus. Coach Thad Matta compared Oden, Conley Jr. and Cook to this freshman class, because many of them have played more than 200 games together throughout high school and Amateur Athletic Union basketball. That familiarity showed and will likely help this year’s class in the early going. This class also allows Matta to have more depth than last year’s six- or seven-man rotation. “One of the coaches said to me the other day, ‘It’s exciting that all 10 guys get along on the court,’” Matta said. “And that’s the exciting thing. I think we can have a deeper bench.” In the 2006-07 season, the Buckeyes went nine deep, which proved beneficial in both the Big Ten and NCAA tournaments. There are even more similarities when comparing the individual players of each class. Oden was Indiana’s Mr. Basketball, a McDonald’s All-American and won a state championship his senior year in high school. Freshman Deshaun Thomas earned the same honors playing at Bishop Luers in Fort Wayne, Ind. But Thomas isn’t the most hyped player in his class. That honor goes to fellow All-American Jared Sullinger. Regarded as one of the premiere freshman in the country, Sullinger is arguably the most high-profile freshmen in Columbus since Oden. Thomas might be more comparable to Cook in his ability to create instant offense. Lighty said Thomas is a great shooter and has the ability to take the ball into the post and score. Although it’s not clear if Thomas will work more at forward or guard for the Buckeyes, he has demonstrated his ability to light up the scoreboard. Point guard Aaron Craft was one of Sullinger’s AAU teammates, like Conley Jr. and Oden were. Matta said he likes what he’s seen from the freshman ball handler. “I don’t think we’ve ever had a freshman come to camp more ready to go physically than he was,” Matta said. “One of the things we’ve asked him to do was work on his ability to knock down shots, and he’s shown his ability to do that. We’ve always liked his defense.” With the classes showing many similarities, there are expectations to match. But that doesn’t seem to bother Lighty and his teammates. “I started off with a national championship” appearance, Lighty said. “So hopefully we can end that way.” read more

Sports information directors The people behind the scenes of Ohio State sports

Although they will never make a single play on the field or the court, sports information directors (SIDs) make the headlines for almost every game. A SID provides information to media and fans, which can include working on media guides, updating a team’s Twitter feed and updating live statistics during games, said SID and assistant director of athletics communications at OSU Brett Rybak. “You’re kind of the intermediary between the media and the team,” said Rybak. “We’ll set up interviews and release information to various media outlets after games.” Rybak, in his third year with OSU, worked in the sports information department while he was an undergraduate at Otterbein University. During his senior year at Otterbein, Rybak was a student intern in the OSU athletics communications. In 2012, Rybak worked as the SID for OSU women’s soccer, baseball, women’s gymnastics, rifle and pistol teams as well as helped with men’s basketball and football. For those who work in media, like former Lantern editor-in-chief Zack Meisel, a SID is the middle-man between student-athletes and the media. “It’s a unique role and a critical one in sports,” said Meisel, who currently works for MLB.com. “There’s always going to be that separation between players and reporters. The SIDs are the ones who will set everything up, make sure the media has what it needs and at the same time makes sure that the players have the privacy and security they need because you can’t just go directly to a player for something.” Meisel said OSU’s system, which has many directors covering multiple sports, works well. “If you’re going to be a reporter and cover Ohio State, it obviously helps to get to know the SIDs a little bit,” Meisel said. “When I started out, I introduced myself to as many as I could, just to avoid potential snags.” Another former Buckeye sportswriter said he had mostly positive experiences with SIDs, but journalists must be wary of the information they give. “You just have to be careful as a journalist not to fall into a trap of where you’re taking everything they feed you,” said Grant Freking, a sportswriter for the Greenfield Daily Reporter in Greenfield, Ind. “They’re not going to give you the story; they’re going to give you what you ask for. You can’t just rely on them or expect them to go above and beyond for you. You accept what they give you and have to ask for something else in return so you can get that extra layer.” Rybak said he tries to maintain a good working relationship with not only the media, but the teams as well. “I think it’s a professional relationship of mutual respect,” Rybak said of the coaches and athletes. “They know what I have to do and I know what they have to do. For them, the most important thing is playing the game and stuff like that. So you take that into account, but I have to get my job done as well.” Since the SIDs work closely with sports teams each season, the players and coaches form relationships with them and have their own opinions of the SIDs. “Well, (Rybak) means a lot to me,” said OSU baseball coach Greg Beals. “He helps coordinate all these (media-related) activities and stuff that goes on. I’m a baseball guy. I’d prefer to be out there on the field in uniform instead of in front of cameras. He helps coordinate that.” Beals said Rybak also collects information and statistics the team finds useful. “The other thing is that I’m a numbers guy,” Beals said. “So he makes sure we get the stats and I have all the information I need to crunch my special numbers and do some things for our players. I like to motivate them with different numbers than just batting average and that stuff.” Both journalists and coaches agreed that SIDs play important roles for their respective jobs during games. Rybak said it’s tough work, but that it can be rewarding. “Fifteen-hour days aren’t out of the question, that’s for sure,” Rybak said. “It’s definitely not easy, but it has its rewards as well. I’d be paying attention to sports anyways, so why not make a career out of it? I get to pay attention to sports every day. On top of that, you get to get stories out of the student-athletes. I’d say that’s the most rewarding part of it.” read more

Championship culture the goal for Ohio State womens basketball

Sophomore guard Ameryst Alston (14) drives to the basket during a game against Iowa Jan. 19 at the Schottenstein Center. OSU lost, 81-74.Credit: Ryan Robey / For The LanternDespite having a new coaching staff and playing the hardest schedule in the country, the Ohio State women’s basketball team is three games above .500 on the year and has plenty to look forward to on the season.The Buckeyes (12-9, 2-3) are led in scoring by sophomore guard Ameryst Alston, who is averaging 17 points per game and was a two-time Associated Press Ms. Basketball in the state of Ohio while at Canton McKinley High School.OSU has also received key contributions this season from another sophomore guard, Cait Craft, who leads the team in 3-pointers.Craft, who is averaging 8.8 points a game so far this season, said the OSU program has a very bright future.“I do have a lot of confidence in the team, especially this year,” Craft said. “I have a lot confidence with the new coaching staff. Everyone is buying into their system which makes it a lot of fun.”OSU coach Kevin McGuff is not only trying to change the culture of the program, but his attempts to bring in the nation’s best players are not going unnoticed. OSU’s 2014 recruiting class is ranked No. 7 in the country, according to ESPN.Not only has McGuff signed a top-10 recruiting class, he has also brought in two transfers from power conference schools, Georgetown and Duke.Freshman guard Kianna Holland from Duke and freshman forward Shayla Cooper from Georgetown are set to join the team on the court after Fall Semester exams are finished.Even with everything building toward the future, McGuff said he is still focused on the current season.“I have not thought too much about next year,” McGuff said. “When I think about the future, it is just about creating a championship culture.”Creating that culture could be made easier by the return of Alston and Craft to the lineup — both lead the team in average minutes per game — as well as redshirt-junior guard Amy Scullion, who is set to return next year as a fifth-year senior.Scullion, who leads the team in 3-point shooting percentage, said expectations are high going forward.“I want us to make the (NCAA) tournament,” Scullion said about the current Buckeye team. “I think coach McGuff has done a great job of changing the culture of this program and he has made it a winning program.”The Buckeyes missed out on the NCAA tournament last season for the first time since the 2001-02 season, ultimately leading to the firing of former coach Jim Foster. OSU also finished tied for eighth in the Big Ten last season, tied for their worst finish in the conference since the 2000-01 season.The Buckeyes are looking to further the winning culture this Thursday, as they are set to travel to Ann Arbor to take on Michigan (13-5, 4-1) at 7 p.m. read more

Save the Date a Holocaust legend coming to Providenciales

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppProvidenciales, #Turks and Caicos Islands – February 27, 2018 – Organisers are admonishing residents, especially fans of the legendary novel ‘The Diary of Anne Frank’ to remember to save the date, Wednesday March 14, 2018 – that is when Eva Schloss will make an historic appearance and presentation.Schloss is one of the pivotal, real life characters from the acclaimed novel  which has been published in some 60 languages and she arrives in the Turks and Caicos in March for a series of events to share her captivating story.  The general public is invited to attend the free event at the Shore Club on March 14, 2018.  Doors Open at 6:30pm, the progam begins at 7pm.An Evening with Eva Schloss is courtesy of the Provo Jewish Community, with free admission.Schloss, who is a Holocaust survivor was the childhood friend and step-sister of Anne Frank and will share her own intriguing story of resilience. Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Related Items:#diaryofannefrank, #evaschloss, #provojewishcommunitylast_img read more