Crazy about Eriksen: Inter and United want you in this market

first_imgTottenham, for its part, can only trust that the arrival on the bench of Jose Mourinho make him change his mind, but it seems that the player has already made the decision to leave and only remains to know when he will go and where he will go: “The only thing I can tell you is that I know what he will do, but it won’t be me who says so. It’s up to him to say what it is and when he’ll decide to talk about it, not about me.” Eriksen can choose and if everyone fights for him he can get a high chip go to the team that goes. Both from England and from Italy, they point out that Inter and United would be willing to pay now, but the player is the one with the last word. In the case of the Italian team there has even been talk of paying a bonus of 20 million euros to the player to make the decision now and thus avoid all the competition that may arise at the beginning of the next semester. These last two clubs, precisely, are aware of how difficult it will be for them to bid with such competition and intend to get ahead trying to convince them to change their air this month. To do this, they would have to pay Tottenham an amount close to the 30 million eurosalthough the Daniel Levy He does not have many weapons to press, since the player has not wanted to renew and knows that if he leaves in summer he will have the option to negotiate a somewhat higher chip if his buyer does not pay a single euro to the London team. Each day that passes the price of the player is a little lower and retain six months knowing that they would not enter anything does not seem the most appropriate option. 2. 3 Premier League* Data updated as of January 2, 2020 Since yesterday, all players whose contracts expire on June 30, 2020 are free to negotiate with other clubs. This is the case of Christian Eriksen, Perhaps the best market opportunity right now. The Danish of Tottenham It is intended by endless teams. Real Madrid is the one that has sounded the strongest and perhaps the one that the midfielder likes, but they have also been interested Juventus, PSG, Inter de Milan or Manchester United. A series* Data updated as of January 2, 2020last_img read more

Where Will Obama Find $100 Million for the New HIV Cure Initiative?

first_imgWhen President Barack Obama announced yesterday “a new initiative at the National Institutes of Health [NIH] to advance research into an HIV cure,” he noted that the government would “redirect $100 million into this project.” But Obama did not specify where the money would be redirected from, and a subsequent NIH press release offered only a hint of more detail, noting that money “will come from existing resources and a redirection of funds from expiring AIDS research grants over the next three years.”In an e-mail to ScienceInsider, Jack Whitescarver, director of NIH’s Office of AIDS Research, explained that “existing resources” means NIH’s existing $3.1 billion HIV/AIDS budget: No new money will come from other parts of NIH. About 20% to 25% of NIH grants expire each year and become eligible to recompete, Whitescarver says, and some will not merit refunding because they focus “on areas of AIDS-related research that are now considered less pressing.” As an example, he singled out research on AIDS-associated opportunistic infections, which previously was a high priority. “But with the advent of effective antiretroviral therapy, that research, while still scientifically meritorious, is now of lower priority for funding with AIDS research dollars,” Whitescarver explained.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)The official shift in priorities meshes with what has been happening in the field. HIV/AIDS researchers over the past 5 years have put increasing emphasis on studying cure-related issues like viral latency and ridding the body of the small reservoir of infected cells that remain even when anti-HIV drugs fully suppress viral replication. NIH has committed $65 million this fiscal year, for example, to research targeting “eradication of viral reservoirs.”Obama’s announcement took many HIV cure researchers and advocates by surprise, but it was welcome news—with a decided note of cautious optimism. “I like the idea that they’re recognizing cure research, but who’s going to decide what other areas of research don’t need to be done?” asks Rowena Johnston, director of research at amfAR, a New York City-based nonprofit that long has been at the forefront of funding cure studies. “We’re very strenuously not a fan of robbing Peter to pay Paul, and right now we don’t know who Peter is.”last_img read more