Invisible Subs and Other Tricks Inspired by Life

first_imgWorking scientists seem less focused on evolution and more on design these days, figuring out how animals and plants do amazing things.Camouflage (PhysOrg): “Scientists discover new camouflage mechanism fish use in open ocean.” A paper in Science analyzes how ocean fish are so skilled at evading predators. Guanine platelets in their scales appear to render them invisible, giving them omnidirectional camouflage. This is making Navy submarine designers eager to see if that can be applied to submarines. “I think it’s a great example of how human applications can take advantage of evolutionary solutions and the value of evolutionary biology,” one said, without specifying exactly what evolution has to do with it other than claiming, without proof, the BAD idea that “Fish have evolved the means to detect polarized light.”Crystal eyes (Science): Science Magazine posted a video showing how humble chitons (oval shaped marine mollusks) use crystal eyes to detect predators. Scientists reporting in Science revealed that these relatively simple creatures are covered in thousands of eye-like light detectors made of the same “biomineralized armor” in their shells (original paper here). “The work offers a striking example of how a single material can perform two jobs—seeing and protecting—at once,” Elizabeth Pennisi says in Science, envisioning how this trick could lead to visual networks in robots. “And it may offer insight to materials scientists seeking to design their own dual-use materials.” Live Science mentions several other animals, like brittlestars, limpets and oysters, that share this secret (on brittle stars, see 8/23/01).Blood clotting (Science Daily): to nurse in surgery room: “Hand me the snake venom.” No, it’s not a plot for a horror movie. The article explains that the dreaded cocktail of poisons in the fangs of certain South American pit vipers “quickly turns into a gel that conforms to the site of a wound, keeping it closed, and promotes clotting within seconds.” See? They’re just trying to help you. “It’s interesting that you can take something so deadly and turn it into something that has the potential to save lives,” a researcher said.Space exploration (PhysOrg): Is this one about Space Duck or Felix the Martian Cat? Not quite, but “Bio-mimicry and space exploration” contains this praise to nature’s wisdom:Nature is more fascinating the deeper you look into it. When we look deeply into nature, we’re peering into a laboratory that is over 3 billion years old, where solutions to problems have been implemented, tested, and revised over the course of evolution. That’s why biomimicry is so elegant: on Earth, nature has had more than 3 billion years to solve problems, the same kinds of problems we need to solve to advance in space exploration.It’s not quite clear why evolution didn’t equip us humans with these same solutions if they are out there in nature among birds, ants, termites and other things; did we lose something along the way? Setting aside the moyboy terminology, it’s clear that (despite the Darwinese) the focus of the article is on rational design. The article describes a panoply of engineering solutions in sunflowers, extremophiles, and many other living things, and includes eight short videos showing researchers learning engineering secrets from a variety of creatures from bees to snakes.Robot stability: Many robots—if they could talk—would cry it, “Help; I’ve fallen and I can’t get up.” Maybe we humans do have something to inspire biomimetics. PhysOrg reports that engineers at Carnegie Mellon are developing a “Strategy based on human reflexes [that] may keep legged robots and prosthetic legs from tripping.” Well-designed prosthetic devices using those principles could return the favor, helping amputees regain a solid footing.Gecko foot cleaner: Wall-climbing geckos, those icons of biomimetics, are in the news again. This time, researchers publishing in Nature Communications found the secret to keeping their toe pads clean. The Chinese & American team describes a “unique self-cleaning mechanism” built into the gecko’s toe pads (spatulae) as follows: “The difference between the velocity-dependent particle-wall adhesion and the velocity-independent spatula-particle dynamic response leads to a robust self-cleaning capability, allowing geckos to efficiently dislodge dirt during their locomotion.” They imitated this mechanism with artificial materials and found similar effects. “This work should open the door to the development of novel self-cleaning adhesives, smart surfaces, microelectromechanical systems, biomedical devices, and more.”Quick TakesRoboBee is getting an upgrade. Laser eyes on the bee-like micro air vehicle may help locate disaster victims. (Live Science)Lobster eyes inspired a lightweight mirror that will be flown on a Chinese-French space observatory. (PhysOrg)Spider web silk is helping eastern US scientists develop stickier glues that retain their adhesiveness in humid environments. (PhysOrg)Wood you have known that wood is “an ideal raw material” to replace petroleum-based products with renewable alternatives? German and American scientists are exploring “xylochemistry” to derive materials for a variety of applications. (PhysOrg)Mantis shrimp mastery of circular polarization (11/19/15) could lead to “applications in satellite remote sensing, biomedical imaging, cancer detection, and computer data storage” (Science Daily).Epithelial cells in animal tissues are often “stretched, deformed and bashed about but they do not tear.” Here’s a great project for biomimetics: designing materials possessing the same properties. (PhysOrg)Viruses are little nano-machines that deliver goods. Why can’t humans imitate their packaging and delivery principles? Chinese scientists are looking at “Virus-mimetic nanovesicles as a versatile antigen-delivery system” for good. (PNAS)Finally, Robots can teach us about ourselves (PhysOrg). In his study of autism, biomechanist Madhusudhan Venkadesan has to build robots to understand humans to help humans.“Building a robot is a more definitive test of a design principle than anything I can do in biology,” Venkadesan says. “If I believe this ligament or that tendon is responsible for energy efficient running, or for stability, I can’t remove the ligament in your body to test my theory. But with a robot, I can. I can do that, and I can use any insights from that to better understand you while you’re running.”Thus biomimetics comes full circle. It recalls the famous quote by T. S. Eliot, “We shall not cease from exploration, and the end of all our exploring will be to arrive where we started and know the place for the first time.”It may take time, but biomimetics has the potential to leave Darwinism in the dust and usher in a golden age of scientific understanding, application and prosperity. Help young people catch the vision. If you have influence as a teacher or parent, tell them about these real-life science projects that are doing great good. They’ll never look at a bumblebee, snake, or bird the same way again, and some day they may offer help to millions of people.(Visited 43 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

President Zuma declares official funeral for late Minister Chabane

first_imgThe late Minister for Public Service and Administration, Mr Collins Chabane, who tragically passed on in a road collision on the N1 highway near Polokwane, in Limpopo on Sunday, 15 March 2015, will be laid to rest on Saturday, 21 March 2015, at Xikundzu village in Malamulele, Limpopo Province.The Minister will be accorded an Official Funeral.The Official Funeral Category 1 is reserved for the following persons:• Serving Ministers• Speaker of the National Assembly• Chief Justice of the Republic of South Africa• Chairperson of the National Council of Provinces (NCOP)• Premiers of ProvincesThe President has ordered that the National Flag be flown at half-mast at all flag posts in the Republic on Saturday 21 March 2015, the day of the funeral.Memorial serviceThe memorial service for Minister Chabane will be held on Thursday, 19 March 2015, at 12h00, at the Pretoria City Hall, Tshwane.Enquiries: Mac Maharaj on 079 879 3203 or macmaharaj@icloud.comIssued by: The PresidencyPretoria17 March 2015last_img read more

Rajasthan to scrap education criterion

first_imgThe Rajasthan Assembly on Monday passed two Bills which seek to end the minimum education criterion for panchayat and civic poll candidates. The House passed by voice vote the Rajasthan Panchayati Raj (Amendment) Bill, 2019 and the Rajasthan Municipality (Amendment) Bill, 2019. The previous Vasundhara Raje-led government had introduced education criterion in 2015 which required a candidate to pass Class X for contesting zila parishad, panchayat samiti and municipal elections. For contesting elections for sarpanch of a panchayat in scheduled and non-scheduled areas, it was mandatory to pass Class V and VIII, respectively. Replying to the debate on the Rajasthan Panchayati Raj Amendment Bill, 2019, Panchayati Raj Minister Sachin Pilot said that the present government is committed for development of every section of the society.‘Against Constitution’ “Sarpanches awarded by President, Vice President were declared ineligible due to the provisions in the previous Act. The Act was against the basics of the Constitution. Society cannot be divided on the basis of education,” Mr. Pilot said. He said that education criterion should first be introduced for contesting Assembly and parliamentary elections. Local Self Government Minister Shanti Kumar Dhariwal presented the Rajasthan Municipality (Amendment) Bill, 2019. In reply to the debate on the Bill, Mr. Dhariwal said the Congress in its election manifesto had promised to scrap education criterion for contesting municipality elections.last_img read more

Three held for hacking Facebook account, posting obscene messages

first_imgThree persons including a couple from Rajasthan were arrested allegedly for hacking the Facebook account of a person in Reasi district of Jammu and Kashmir and posting vulgar and obscene messages, police said on Sunday. Varinder Singh had lodged a written complaint on December 25 last year alleging that some unknown persons hacked his Facebook account and embarrassed his family by creating his fake ID and IDs of his wife and sister and sharing his family photographs with vulgar and obscene messages, a police spokesman said. He said an FIR under relevant sections of the Information Technology Act and the Ranbir Penal code was registered at the Reasi police station and the investigation set into motion.Third accused During investigation, the spokesman said the Internet Protocol addresses of the fake ID’s were retrieved from Facebook and the accused were identified as Rahul Jain, his wife Kirti Jain of Jaipur and Parvinder Singh alias Rocky, a local driver. “It came to the light that the couple had once visited Reasi and had exchanged their phone numbers with the complainant. Later, they managed to contact the third accused through the friend list of Facebook account of the complainant,” he said. He said the accused couple were arrested from their residence in Jaipur by a special team on a court warrant and were brought to Reasi on Saturday and on their disclosure, the third accused was also arrested.last_img read more

Italian prosecutors break up Chinese transport mafia

first_imgMILAN – Italian law enforcement has broken up a Chinese organized crime ring that used money from criminal activities to force its way into European trucking companies and control the movement of Chinese-made goods in much of Europe, anti-Mafia prosecutors said Thursday.Top anti-Mafia prosecutor Federico Cafiero de Raho told reporters in Florence that the organization used mafia methods, including intimidation, extortion and violence.He said the ring earned cash from drug trafficking, gambling and prostitution in locations throughout Italy, which they used to take over transportation companies in Italy, France, Spain and Germany.More than 50 people were under investigation, most in the Tuscan city of Prato, a key centre of Chinese business in Italy. Arrest warrants were issued for 33 people, including several already jailed on other charges, two in France and two in China.The criminal components hail mostly from the Chinese provinces of Zhejiang and Fujian, police said in a statement.The prosecutor said that the Chinese-run transport companies laundered money from the criminal businesses, and that they were also a form of illicit competition with legitimate companies operating under the law.last_img read more

Indigenous leaders welcome chance to invest in Alberta renewable power auction

first_imgCALGARY – Indigenous leaders say they are eager to invest after Alberta unveiled a plan on Monday that demands bidders in one of its next two rounds of renewable power project auctions include partnerships with those communities.The province said it hopes to attract bids to build a total of 700 megawatts of renewable power capacity, enough to power 300,000 homes, with 300 MW reserved for proposals with Indigenous equity ownership and 400 MW without restriction.Winners in both new rounds of bids will be judged on their power price bids, said Environment Minister Shannon Phillips.She added the province hopes to duplicate the success of its first round, held last year, when three companies were chosen to spend about $1 billion to build four wind power projects capable of generating 600 MW of new generation, 50 per cent higher than target. They bid an average price of $37 per MW-hour, which the province touted as a record low price for renewable power in Canada.The Kainai First Nation is planning a 200-MW wind project that’s “shovel-ready” to be built if selected, said Chief Roy Fox of the southern Alberta tribe also known as the Blood Tribe, speaking at the government’s news conference in Calgary.“We want to proceed with the first phase, which is 100 megawatts, and we have everything in place,” said Fox, who also goes by the name Makiinima. “We have the expertise, we’ve built some capacity, we have the financing in place, we’re ready to go and it will be situated on our reserve lands.”He said later the First Nation has an agreement to obtain funding from Indigena Capital, a Utah-based firm that finances Indigenous projects, but wouldn’t give a cost estimate for the project.Aaron Young, chief of the Chiniki First Nation, said his community is already pursuing solar power options.“We are good partners,” he said at the conference. “Just know, for us, success is well-being of our First Nations, of our people, and respect for the land that we all call home.”Successful auction bidders will win a 20-year contract with the province that provides subsidies if power prices fall below the bid price, to be paid from Alberta’s carbon levy on heavy industrial emitters. If the price is higher, the companies are to pay the difference to the province.The province wants to add up to 5,000 MW of renewable energy through private sector investment of about $10 billion by 2030.“Climate change is indeed the greatest challenge humanity has ever faced. It is real,” Phillips said. “But it represents trillions in economic opportunity around the world. Albertans want to be part of those new jobs, those new businesses.”Phillips said she expects wind power projects to be most successful at auction because they cost the least but she said the government is considering ways to encourage other options such as solar power in future auctions to improve reliability of the system.Details of the upcoming auctions are to be worked out by the Alberta Electric System Operator over the next several months and a request for proposals is expected in the spring, with winning bids selected by year-end, said AESO chief operating officer Mike Law.He said bidders in the 300-MW round will need at least 15 to 25 per cent Indigenous ownership to qualify.Follow @HealingSlowly on Twitter.last_img read more

Petronas said to possibly be looking to buy Chevrons stake in Kitimat

first_imgTORONTO, O.N. — Petronas could possibly be looking to get back into the Canadian LNG game after sources said that Chevron is exploring options including selling its minority stake in the proposed Kitimat LNG project.According to Reuters, three unnamed sources said that Petronas is among the parties in talks with Chevron for a possible stake in Kitimat LNG, after it scuppered plans to build the $36-billion Pacific NorthWest LNG project last July because of unfavourable market conditions. Speaking anonymously, the sources told Reuters that it was not guaranteed that Chevron would sell its stake. They said that Chevron is considering selling a stake in Kitimat LNG to a financial investor such as a Canadian pension fund or a private equity firm.The sources added that Seven Generations Energy Ltd and Tourmaline Oil Corp are also in discussions to supply natural gas to Chevron’s project, and that Seven Generations may also consider buying a stake in the project by partnering with other gas producers. Kitimat LNG, a 50/50 joint venture with Australia’s Woodside Petroleum Ltd, has a 20-year, 10 million-metric-tonne-per-year export license for LNG and is expected to cost tens of billions of dollars to build. Story courtesy The Globe and Mail/Reuters: https://www.theglobeandmail.com/report-on-business/industry-news/energy-and-resources/chevron-in-talks-to-sell-stake-in-canadian-lng-project-sources/article38211025/?utm_source=Shared+Article+Sent+to+User&utm_medium=E-mail:+Newsletters+/+E-Blasts+/+etc.&utm_campaign=Shared+Web+Article+Linkslast_img read more

Selfishness Racism and Hypocrisy of Some Adults Ruined It

It is sad that a story that resonated and inspired so many has been imploded by so few. When Little League baseball—little league!—can be compromised by adults with their own agenda, it’s as clear an indication as any of the corruption that engulfs us.Kids playing a kid’s game has gone political, controversial and, yes, racial, with the kids the ultimate losers in all the machinations by self-serving, jealous and timid adults.Not just the Jackie Robinson West players who had their U.S. Championship rescinded on the heels of allegations that kids who did not live in the implicit district were playing on the team. But there will be other kids who will lose, too.In the world we live in, when Black people achieve something significant, they still often are trailblazers setting the path for others to follow their journey.Think the next all-Black team that dominates in little league baseball won’t be vetted beyond non-Black teams because of this fiasco? Of course, they will.This isn’t about race; it’s about reality. Want to shield your vision from what has happened time and again in corporate American or newsrooms or apartment leasing offices, go ahead. Some of us set the stage for others to follow, and if one goes awry, the decision-makers (Caucasians) heavily consider that misstep before granting another African-American an opportunity.Indeed, Black people often rue the conduct of other Black people. Say, for instance, Charles Barkley says something dumb, as he is wont to do. Many of us shudder, understanding that while Barkley does not represent us, his words and views inevitably will in some way be used against us.That phenomenon makes this little league baseball scandal that much more disheartening and significant.Even Jesse Jackson has come out from his seeming retirement to chime in on behalf of his fellow Chicagoans. “This is persecution. This is not right, it’s unnecessary. And it’s not fair,” Jackson said the other day at a press conference.He may be right. This whole drama started when a mostly white team from Chicago called authorities to say the Jackie Robinson West squad had players on its roster that did not live in the district. This also, it is important to note, was after the JRW team beat the brakes off that mostly white team, 43-2. And this came after JRW had captured the nation with a Little League World Series run that was marked by immense talent and admirable grace.Now, a city known for corruption in politics, has this on its ledger, too. And it’s the kids who are pained the most.“Little League says that they teach character and they teach courage. Well, this isn’t an act of courage and this sure isn’t an act of character. Brandon Green and his teammates, they earned the championship win and we will not stop until justice is done,” said Venisa Green, mother of JRW player Brandon Green.Renown Catholic priest Michael Pfleger said the words: “You need to reverse this unless you’re going to go after all 16 teams. This is a racist attack and racist at the foot of this, and there’s no way I’ll back off from that, none whatsoever.”The argument that every team has players living outside the designated zones does not make what JRW is alleged to have done right. But it sure is interesting that Evergreen Park, the whistleblowers on JRW, had at least one player from outside its area on its team in 2011. Renee Cannon-Young said her son, Jacoby, was recruited to play in Evergreen Park’s Little League, despite living on Chicago’s South Side.“The paperwork was filled out for me,” Cannon-Young said. “I was told that although he was not a resident of Evergreen Park, they were going to fix that so that he could play. Just use another address, and he would be able to play.”When Cannon-Young learned of Evergreen Park’s ratting out JRW, she screamed hypocrisy.So serious is this that Chicago mayor Raham Emanuel put it on his radar. He supports the team holding on to its championship. “Every home run was real,” he said. “Every great catch was real. The passion they brought from Chicago to Williamsport was real. And the character they showed on and off the field was real.”In vacating the title, Emanuel said, “You have turned (the youths) into the perpetrators when they are the victims. You know what they have done for Chicago, and let’s face it, you know what they’ve done for your tournament.”Jackie Robinson West player Brandon Green added: “We work hard all year long. And we went down there to play baseball and we weren’t involved in anything that could’ve caused us to be stripped of our championship.”This weekend, Rainbow PUSH (yes, it’s still around) plans to have a rally for the devastated and embarrassed players, to remind them that they are still champions, if not on paper any longer. Hovering above the occasion will be this truth: Adults who are supposed to be responsible let down the kids they are charged to protect. read more

Ohio State fall sports wrap

It was a down year for the Buckeye fall sports teams, with no Big Ten championships won by any squad. However, the teams secured five NCAA tournament bids this season with women’s volleyball still in contention. Women’s field hockey and men’s soccer ended the regular season with the best conference success, narrowly missing out on first place and securing second in the Big Ten. Despite the overall lack of championship success, the Buckeyes earned several high individual honors and each team had its own season highlights. Men’s soccer For the first time since 2006, the Ohio State men’s soccer team was not a part of the NCAA tournament. Junior midfielder Chris Hegngi and senior defender David Tiemstra headlined a list of eight OSU players who received Big Ten awards; Hegngi and Tiemstra were named the conference’s best offensive and defensive player, respectively. Tiemstra and Hegngi were named First-Team All-Big Ten while senior forward Parnell Hegngi, junior midfielder Austin McAnena and junior goalkeeper Matt Lampson earned second-team honors. The Buckeyes finished with an overall 10-7-2 record, 4-2 in the Big Ten, placing second behind Northwestern. After losing to Northwestern on Oct. 9, a regular season conference championship seemed unlikely as the team sat at 7-5-1 overall and 2-1 in the conference. Coach John Bluem said the game was “one of the worst performances by an OSU team in (his) 15 years here.” The team responded, going 3-0-1 in its next four contests to put itself in a position to win the title in its final regular season game. OSU was not up to the task as they fell to Indiana on the road, 1-0. “It was certainly a disappointment to come away without a win and not win the championship outright,” Bluem said in a press release. “But it was definitely a difficult task at hand.” OSU had won the Big Ten tournament the last four years, but the team was defeated by Penn State in the first round of the tournament, ending its season. Women’s soccer At first glance the OSU women’s soccer team’s final regular season record of 10-8-1 and subsequent first-round loss in the Big Ten tournament doesn’t seem like anything too special. However, it was a couple of program milestones and an unlikely run in the NCAA tournament that made the 2011 season memorable. The Buckeyes received a bid to the national tournament, albeit one the team and coach Lori Walker did not expect to receive, and collected upset victories against Tennessee and Milwaukee to advance to the Sweet Sixteen to play Duke, the top-seeded team in the region. OSU led the Blue Devils, 1-0, at halftime, but two second-half goals by Duke ended the Buckeyes’ tournament run. “This team found a second life and made something of it,” Walker said following the loss. “We always said we wanted to advance until we met a team that is playing better than us … I give credit to our seniors for leading us to be here and we’ve got nothing to be disappointed about.” The 2011 senior class tied last year’s class as the winningest four-year group in program history with 51 victories. The Buckeyes also recorded program win No. 200 on Sept. 23 at home against Illinois. Field Hockey The field hockey team ended its 2011 campaign with a 12-9 overall record and 4-2 mark in conference play. By losing to Old Dominion in the first round of the NCAA Tournament, the team overcame its semifinal loss in the conference tournament to make the big dance in three consecutive seasons. This was the Buckeyes’ seventh appearance in the tournament, while six of them have been under 16-year head coach Anne Wilkinson. The team was led by captain and First-Team All-Big Ten honoree Jenn Sciulli while forwards Berta Queralt, Danica Deckard and midfielder Paula Pastor-Pitarque were named Second-Team All-Big Ten selections. The team strongly depended on its defense in many of its games. Goaltender and captain Ally Tunitis notched four shutouts on the season and now holds the single-season wins record for OSU goalkeepers. The season was far from a failure due to the girls’ most notable win against No. 11 Michigan when they won, 2-1, in a thriller to kick off conference play. Tunitis described the win as the “most meaningful moment of the season.” Women’s volleyball The women’s volleyball team has yet to finish its season, as it will be making its way to Florida, Saturday and Sunday, for the Gainesville Regional to face the winner of Illinois and Marquette in the Sweet 16. The team finished its regular season with an overall record of 21-14 and a conference record of 9-11. The Buckeyes’ rollercoaster ride of a season sparked surprise at their tournament run, but a win over No. 14 Tennessee on Friday kept the girls’ season hopes alive. Junior Mari Hole was the only Buckeye named a First-Team All-Big Ten honoree while Kelli Barhorst was named a Sportsmanship Award honoree. Men’s cross-country The OSU men’s cross-country team was without its No. 1 runner for most of the 2011 season. For most teams, losing a top runner would spell doom, but for the Buckeyes this season, it did not. OSU qualified for the 2011 NCAA National Championships in Terra Haute, Ind., and finished 23rd out of 31 teams on Nov. 21 to conclude its season. The National Championship appearance was the third in five years for head coach Robert Gary and the Buckeyes. Redshirt senior Jake Edwards, OSU’s top runner coming at the beginning of the year, suffered a hamstring injury at the Notre Dame Invitational on Sept. 30 and missed the rest of the season. Led by junior Donny Roys and redshirt senior Taylor Williams, the Buckeyes were resilient. Two weeks after losing Edwards, OSU ran at the Wisconsin Adidas Invitational on Oct. 14. Among a field featuring 20 of the top 30 programs in the nation, the Buckeyes finished 17th. The men went on to finish fifth at both the Big Ten Championships on Oct. 30 and NCAA Great Lakes Regionals on Nov. 12, and received an at-large berth to the NCAA National Championships. Roys and Williams paced the way for the Buckeyes at the National Championship meet, placing 95th and 100th, respectively. Gary said the 2011 season was one of his all-time favorites. “I would have to say … (the 2011 team) was my third favorite team ever to have,” he said. Women’s cross-country The 2011 OSU women’s cross-country season has assistant coach Chris Neal optimistic for 2012. The Buckeyes sent two runners to the 2011 NCAA National Championships in Terra Haute, Ind., on Nov. 21 as individual qualifiers, and finished sixth at the NCAA Great Lakes Regionals on Nov. 12. Four of OSU’s top-five runners will return in 2012. “(This season) is definitely a building block going forward,” Neal said. Jordan Jennewine, the team’s lone senior, along with junior Tori Brink and freshman Nicole Hilton, led the Buckeyes this season. A first-place finish at the Mountaineer Open in Boone, N.C., on Sept. 16 by both Jennewine and OSU as a team, started off the season on a high point. Following a disappointing 38th-place finish at the Wisconsin Adidas Invitational on Oct. 14, the Buckeyes failed to impress at the Big Ten Championships on Oct. 30, placing ninth as a team. OSU sixth-place finish at the regional meet didn’t earn the team a bid to the NCAA National Championships, but Brink and Hilton were individual selections. Brink and Hilton ran well again at the National Championship, finishing near the top half of the field in 120th and 142nd place. Golf The OSU men’s golf team’s opened its autumn slate on a high note with its second consecutive and 19th team title overall in the 15-team Marshall Invitational, with senior Alex Redfield claiming the individual title. The Buckeyes hit a bit of a rough patch after that, finishing in a tie for 10th out of 15 teams in the Olympia Fields/Fighting Illini Invitational from Sept. 16-18 and earning a last-place 11th in a rain-shortened Inverness Intercollegiate Invitational on Sept. 27. As the host team of the Jack Nicklaus Invitational from Oct. 10-11, OSU finished second out a field of 12 teams, placing higher than four Top 25 ranked teams. The Buckeyes concluded the season with a last-place performance in the 15-team Isleworth Collegiate Invitational from Oct. 23-25. The OSU women’s golf team finished in third-place or better in all four autumn tournaments in which it played. The Buckeyes opened the season with a runner-up performance in the 12-team Mary Fossum Invitational from Sept. 16-17 and recorded a third-place finish out of 15 teams in the Windy City Invitational from Oct. 3-4. In the Lady Northern Invitational from Oct. 10-11, on the same course that the 2012 Big Ten championship will be played this spring, OSU finished second out of 12 teams. The Buckeyes concluded their fall slate by finishing third out of 18 teams in the Landfall Tradition from Oct. 28-30. Both OSU golf teams will resume play in February. read more

Letter to the Editor Thad Mattas impact on a former manager

Thad Matta addresses the media for the final time as head coach at Ohio State on June 5, 2017. Credit: Courtesy of 97.1 The FanMy junior year of high school, I had just wrapped up a day tour at Ohio State and was literally about to pass out on a couch in the Union. My dad shook me awake and loudly whispered “Brian, that’s Thad Matta!” as Matta walked past with Bobby Knight. I had no idea that 18 months later I’d be starting a four-year term working under him as a student manager from the 2013-14 season through his final season in 2016-17. A phrase that I remember being thrown around a lot as an underclassman in the program was “great player, better person.” Substituting “player” for “coach,” the phrase couldn’t be more true for Coach Matta. He always wanted not just what was best for the team, but what was best for the individuals, as both players and men, and during some of the tougher stretches, the pain he felt from having let his team down as a coach was both visible and genuine. It’s rare to see anyone as invested in their profession as Coach Matta was in his teams and the state of the program. Everyone saw, and unfortunately quickly forgot, the huge success Coach Matta brought to the Ohio State men’s basketball program. Most people don’t get to see what he’s like off the court. Contrary to the occasional beet-red face sometimes seen on the sidelines, he’s actually one of the most laid-back individuals I’ve been with in a work environment. From addressing me by Brian about ten times per day the last week of my senior season after realizing my real name wasn’t “Chops,” which is what my nickname within the program was, to seamlessly transitioning from a regular conversation with me to a Chris Farley Saturday Night Live sketch dialogue, I’ll always appreciate Coach Matta’s wit. I don’t know if he will be back out on the hardwood again, but if not, I know, as he has told me on several occasions, he’s looking forward to living where “It’s never colder than 70 degrees, (he) never has to wear long pants and doesn’t have to put a shirt on before 5 o’clock.”Thanks, Coach.Brian Lamb, former Ohio State men’s basketball manager read more